Public Disclosures

The following information is provided in accordance with the ongoing commitment by Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) to voluntarily disclose events to the public related to the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI).


Port Granby, November 25, 2020 

On 2020 November 23, the independent laboratory that analyzes water discharge samples from the Port Granby Waste Water Treatment Plant notified CNL of an exceedance of an allowable level set to prevent harm to fish. All other discharge parameters were within allowable limits. On receipt of this information, CNL immediately stopped discharging treated water to Lake Ontario. 

Further samples have been sent to the laboratory for analysis, and CNL will not resume discharging water to the lake until results confirm that the treated water is within all allowable limits.

This event does not pose a risk to human health or the safety of people, and the initial analysis results indicate the impact on the environment to be negligible. CNL routinely tests the treated discharge water from the Port Granby Waste Water Treatment Plant, and years of sampling data shows that the treated water has been within allowable limits prior to this result. 

Ongoing testing continues to show that the plant’s advanced treatment technology meets or exceeds stringent Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission requirements for water discharged to Lake Ontario, resulting in enhanced protection of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem.

CNL notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Municipality of Clarington. 


Port Granby, July 29, 2020

At approximately 5:00 p.m. on 2020 July 25, during a routine site inspection, a plant operator observed water leaking from a water holding tank at the Port Granby Waste Water Treatment Plant. Upon discovery of the leak, the plant was shut down and actions were taken to drain the tank and stop the leak. It is estimated that 20-50 m3 of water leaked from the tank and entered the storm water management pond located on the site. The leak was confined to the boundary of the licensed site.

Water and soil samples were collected at various locations along the flow pathway, and sent for analysis.

At no time was there a health or safety risk to workers or the public, and the impact on the environment is expected to be negligible.

CNL proactively notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Municipality of Clarington of this event.


Port Granby, January 28, 2020 

At approximately 8:30 a.m. on 2020 January 27, site personnel discovered surface water leaving catchment areas at the Port Granby Legacy Waste Management Facility.

On discovery of the water flow, CNL’s contractor immediately took actions to stop the flow. 

Water samples were taken at along the flow path and the site perimeter, and have been sent to an independent laboratory for analysis. The results are expected to show that the effect on the environment was negligible. The removal of historic low-level radioactive waste from the site, which began in 2016, is nearly complete. Most of the land in the path of the overflow had already been remediated. 

At no time was there a health or safety risk to workers or the public. 

CNL proactively notified the Spills Action Centre, the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks, Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Municipality of Clarington. 


Port Granby, July 18, 2019

As a result of torrential rainfall causing flash flooding in Southern Ontario on
July 17, 2019, surface water overflowed from catchment areas at the Port Granby Project waste management sites, located near the Lake Ontario shoreline in Southeast Clarington. Berms used to contain the water became inundated and were breached, resulting in overflows.

Upon discovery of the overflows at approximately 7:00 a.m., CNL’s contractor took immediate action to redirect the water by pumping it to on-site storage tanks and ponds, and to deploy additional sandbags, which effectively stopped the overflows. The berms were repaired that same day.

Based on observation of the overflow and the size and extent of the flow paths, it is estimated that 80 – 150 cubic metres of surface water flowed to the lake, about the volume of water in a backyard swimming pool. 

At no time was there a health or safety risk to workers or the public. Water samples were taken at the catchment areas and have been sent to an independent laboratory for analysis. The results are expected to show that the effect on the environment was negligible because the surface water had been diluted significantly by the heavy rainfall.

CNL proactively notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Municipality of Clarington of the overflows. 

A fact-finding investigation by CNL is underway, and this disclosure will be updated if new information becomes available. 


Port Granby, July 17, 2019

As a result of the extreme rainfall on July 17, 2019 that caused widespread flooding across Durham Region, surface water overflowed catchment areas on the Port Granby Project site. CNL took immediate action to address the situation and notify the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and the Spills Action Centre.
There is no health or safety risk to the public, and the effect on the environment is expected to be negligible.

This disclosure will be updated when more information becomes available. 


Port Granby, January 11, 2019

At approximately 11 a.m. on January 9, 2019, a worker was injured while unloading a truck at CNL’s Port Granby Long-Term Waste Management Facility. The injured worker was transported to a medical centre for treatment. Immediately following the incident, CNL stopped work related to the activity, ensured the appropriate regulatory agencies were notified and began a full investigation.

Additional meetings focusing on safe work practices are being held at PHAI sites reinforcing that safety is one of CNL’s core values.

There was no risk to the public and no environmental impact as a result of the incident.


Port Hope, January 9, 2019

At approximately 12:00 p.m. on 2019 Jan. 8, CNL identified a sheen on the water beside a barge being used for PHAI work in Port Hope Harbour. On discovery, absorbent pads were immediately used to remove the sheen, and an absorbent boom was deployed around the barge as a precaution. It was determined that the sheen likely resulted from a very small volume – less than one litre – of hydraulic fluid being washed into the water during barge deck cleaning.

CNL notified the appropriate regulatory agencies, including the Ontario Spills Action Centre and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.  

At no time was there a risk to the safety of workers or the public.


Archive

January 9, 2019